Critical Escape

Exploring the Plight of the Street Artist

The work Critical Escape (after Borrell) is a reinterpretation of Pere Borrell del Caso’s Escaping Criticism (1874). Using the technique of Trompe-l’oeil, Borrell created an optical illusion depicting a young boy climbing out of the picture frame. It is said the work was a reaction to the conservative art critics of his day. To give Shannon’s work a contemporary context, he has replaced the boy with a respirator wearing street artist, who is at times also a victim of a conservative mentality. The simplicity of Borrell’s concept and the effectiveness of its execution resonated with Shannon. This series explores the plight the street artist. Shannon instantly thought of Borrell’s work as a perfect allegory for this theme.

The Critical Escape series consists of figurative paintings exploring the concept of “Escapism”. The work in this collection demonstrates both literal and metaphoric interpretation of this concept. Using the method of Trompe l’oeil, Shannon redefines the boundaries between fictitious space and reality. This creates a paradox between the work and the definition of “Escapism”.

With the street artist as muse, the work explores social and political themes. The key elements of the work is the use of symbolism, dramatic lighting and a monochromatic palette.

The Art of Discovery

75cm x 90cm
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Procrastination

60cm x 80cm
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Critical Escape (After Borrell)

120cm x 100cm
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Diego

75cm x 90cm
Acrylic on Canvas

 

Critical Escape II

100cm x 120cm
Acrylic on Canvas

 

The Great Escape

100cm x 120cm
Acrylic on Canvas

 

A Tell Tale Heart

100cm x 120cm
Acrylic on Canvas